Improved Stress Management When Coping With Stress-Related Illnesses
Improved Stress Management When Coping With Stress-Related Illnesses

Improved Stress Management When Coping With Stress-Related Illnesses

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The key to managing stress-related illnesses is to identify the source of stress in order to find effective ways to overcome them. The medical sector is also looking closely into identification of stress symptoms in order for these conditions to be addressed as soon as possible.

Migraines

This is the most common form of stress-related illness known to man. The connection should be quite apparent due to the level of mental stress that an individual undergoes with constant worry and anxiety. Hence, a lot of highly stressed individuals suffer from constant headaches and migraines.

The medical sector is looking for more effective ways to treat migraine since statistics have shown a growing number of people suffering from it. Currently, statistical data reveal there are 18 million who are migraine sufferers, with 70% of those made up by women. The best recommended cure for migraine is to identify the source of stress and address it to stabilize one’s condition.

Muscle Tension

Muscle tension can either by a symptom of stress or a form of illness resulting from it. Either way, it can devastating to one’s health and must therefore be addressed as soon as possible. An individual suffering from muscle tension will experience pinching sensation around the main limbs and muscles, such as the shoulders, neck, and lower back. Some health researchers have also linked muscle tension with migraine, such that both these conditions usually manifest simultaneously.

High Blood Pressure

This is probably the most common health condition arising from extreme stress levels. Aside from emotional and psychological instability, there is also a physiological explanation to this. Whenever an individual is stressed out, they are release adrenaline hormones that eventually increase activity in your body muscles that is faster than normal. As a result, it also increases the amount of muscle contraction that sends blood throughout your body. This causes tension in your muscles and blood vessels, which is usually not restored until the stimulus is gone.

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